Notes from all over

Some notes from today’s email and Internet browsing…

Saint Justin Popović saw no dichotomy between the Lives of the saints and the theological writings of the Church. For him, as for the Church, theology and the lives of the Saints form one whole. He called the lives of the saints “experiential theology” or “applied dogmatic theology,” and he viewed them and wrote about them in a theological manner. Likewise, he viewed theological writings as an expression of the experience of the life of Grace in the Church, and not just an intellectual, abstract or polemical exercise.


“When I am dead, come to me at my grave, and the more often the better. Whatever is in your soul, whatever may have happened to you, come to me as when I was alive and kneeling on the ground, cast all your bitterness upon my grave. Tell me everything and I shall listen to you, and all the bitterness will fly away from you. And as you spoke to me when I was alive, do so now. For I am living and I shall be forever.”
— Saint Seraphim of Sarov


“When ‘the books are opened,’ it will become clear that the roots of all vices lie in the human soul. Here is a drunkard or a lecher: when the body has died, some may think that sin is dead too. No! There was an inclination to sin in the soul, and that sin was sweet to the soul, and if the soul has not repented of the sin and has not freed itself from it, it will come to the Last Judgment also with the same desire for sin. It will never satisfy that desire and in that soul there will be the suffering of hatred. It will accuse everyone and everything in its tortured condition, it will hate everyone and everything. ‘There will be gnashing of teeth’ of powerless malice and the unquenchable fire of hatred.”
— Saint John Maximovitch (1896-1966 A.D.)

Each of them is worth chewing on for a while.

Saints Barsanuphius and John

Author: Father Silouan Thompson

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